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    Blog — Honda

    Last Of The 305 Scramblers: The Honda CL77

    Last Of The 305 Scramblers: The Honda CL77
    If you wanted to go off-road with a motorcycle in the 1960s, your options were fairly limited to larger, slower bikes that were pushrod-driven and not all that much fun to drive. 

    Honda entered the market with the Honda CL77 in an effort to contrast the lackluster efforts of other manufacturers by adding a more modern up to date design with a smaller, but more rev-happy engine. The result? Between 1965 and 1968, Honda sold an incredible number of the Honda CL77s as a fun, lightweight road bike that could handle off-road trips too. It was just what America was asking for. 

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    Water Cooled V-Twin: The Honda CX500

    Water Cooled V-Twin: The Honda CX500
    For a company to make a splash in the motorcycle world, they either have to make a big claim or have a revolutionary new design. 

    Taking a place in the Honda lineup from 1978 to 1983, the Honda CX500 did a little of each. Rocking the nearly hyperbolic headline “First into the future”, they were actually pretty serious about having a new vision for what motorcycles should look like. 

    This article examines the history of the Honda CX500 from its development and initial reactions to its reception by motorcycle driving audiences.

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    Honda GL1000: The Birth of a Legendary Line

    Honda GL1000: The Birth of a Legendary Line
    From 1973 to 1983, the United States was going through what’s now known as the “malaise era”. It’s not really hard to figure out why this was happening, after all, the Vietnam war had just come to a close, fuel economy/emissions regulations were stricter than ever, and political turmoil was mixing with disco dancing in a way that no one really needed. As a result of all these unique elements, automobiles of the era were slow, bland, and frankly, uninspired.

    Motorcycles of this period, however, were anything but malaise and it seemed like our country had found its passion not in Automobiles but in the culture of motorcycles. This era produced some of the most legendary bikes, machines that would go on to inspire, slightly terrify, and build a permanent place in the hearts of fun-loving men and women everywhere.

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    "Chicago" Honda CB750 Survivor Chopper

    "Chicago" Honda CB750 Survivor Chopper
    The idea, to hand build a one of a kind show stopper that wasn't a Harley Davidson. An idea that Bob Hannon of Schaumburg, Illinois had beginning in 1981 when assembling a team a various Craftsman all over the Midwest to build the “Project: Ultimate Honda.” “The goal is to build the show bike of show bikes, a machine that could not be beaten” said Bob in a Choppers magazine interveiw in 1982.  The build was picked up by the publication Custom bike - Choppers magazine as an ongoing feature in multiple issues during the full build process and the hype really began to circulate about this one of a kind machine. Once completed Bob traveled the show circuit in 1982 winning award after award under the bike name “Chicago.” After a couple of years of racking up trophies, the bike laid dormant only to end up changing hands a couple of times and was then finally discovered again around 2005 by chopper enthusiast Jim Tigner. The bike at that time had been completely disassembled repainted bright purple and crated in a custom crate leaving Jim with the daunting task of collecting all of the 1980’s magazines and figuring out a blueprint to restore “Chicago” to its former 80’s glory.  We caught up with Jim and the fully assembled masterpiece CB750 chopper at this year's Wauseon swap meet and he shared with us a little back story on how he came to restore this one of a kind show stopping Honda survivor chopper.  

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    The Game Changer: Honda CB750

    The Game Changer: Honda CB750
    There are plenty of products out there that like to call themselves game-changers, but few can really live up to that lofty title.

    Honda’s CB750, however, absolute can and could be considered one of the most influential motorcycles to ever roll down the American road. From the comfortable, upright style seating, to the incredibly durable yet powerful 4 cylinder engine, and fade-free disc brakes; the CB750 was the first mass-market, large displacement bike to earn the “Superbike” moniker. It would even go on to form the basis of what a Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM) design would be for decades and decades to come.

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